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Despite Government Warnings Americans Celebrate Thanksgiving

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The government warned Americans not to celebrate Thanksgiving 2020 in large numbers. The entire nation celebrated anyway.

As we reported yesterday, air travel set pandemic era records.

Yesterday, the tradition continued. Thanksgiving has been celebrated in America since 1621.

The event that Americans commonly call the “First Thanksgiving” was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World in October 1621. This feast lasted three days, and—as recounted by attendee Edward Winslow— was attended by 90 Native Americans and 53 Pilgrims.

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Why did only 53 pilgrims attend? Because Forty-five of the 102 Mayflower passengers died in the winter of 1620–21, and the Mayflower colonists suffered greatly during their first winter in the New World from lack of shelter, scurvy, and general conditions on board ship. They were buried on Cole’s Hill in Massachusetts.

History records, husbands would bury their wives one day, their children the next.

Ofcourse, they had no Covid 19 back in 1620. Had Covid existed, would these pilgrims have risked leaving England in their search for liberty and religious freedom?

They believed they had God on their side. During their darkest moment, when all seemed lost, a Native American name Squanto walked into camp speaking perfect English. He taught them how to plant native crops. His efforts saved their lives.

Was this coincidence? The pilgrims were a praying people. They believed fully in the providence of God. They lived by faith.

Early pilgrims often chose to set aside days of thanksgiving. Life was harsh. Death came often.

How the pilgrims viewed both government and God is in vast contrast to modern day America.

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Regardless, in 2020, Americans ignored the bureaucratic state and celebrated alongside their forbearers.

The First Thanksgiving Proclamation June 20 1676

Introduction

On June 20, 1676, the governing council of Charlestown, Massachusetts, held a meeting to determine how best to express thanks for the good fortune that had seen their community securely established. By unamimous vote they instructed Edward Rawson, the clerk, to proclaim June 29 as a day of thanksgiving, our first. That proclamation is reproduced here in the same language and spelling as the original.


“The Holy God having by a long and Continual Series of his Afflictive dispensations in and by the present Warr with the Heathen Natives of this land, written and brought to pass bitter things against his own Covenant people in this wilderness, yet so that we evidently discern that in the midst of his judgements he hath remembered mercy, having remembered his Footstool in the day of his sore displeasure against us for our sins, with many singular Intimations of his Fatherly Compassion, and regard; reserving many of our Towns from Desolation Threatened, and attempted by the Enemy, and giving us especially of late with many of our Confederates many signal Advantages against them, without such Disadvantage to ourselves as formerly we have been sensible of, if it be the Lord’s mercy that we are not consumed, It certainly bespeaks our positive Thankfulness, when our Enemies are in any measure disappointed or destroyed; and fearing the Lord should take notice under so many Intimations of his returning mercy, we should be found an Insensible people, as not standing before Him with Thanksgiving, as well as lading him with our Complaints in the time of pressing Afflictions:

The Council has thought meet to appoint and set apart the 29th day of this instant June, as a day of Solemn Thanksgiving and praise to God for such his Goodness and Favour, many Particulars of which mercy might be Instanced, but we doubt not those who are sensible of God’s Afflictions, have been as diligent to espy him returning to us; and that the Lord may behold us as a People offering Praise and thereby glorifying Him; the Council doth commend it to the Respective Ministers, Elders and people of this Jurisdiction; Solemnly and seriously to keep the same Beseeching that being perswaded by the mercies of God we may all, even this whole people offer up our bodies and soulds as a living and acceptable Service unto God by Jesus Christ.”

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David Hucks is a 12th generation descendant of the area we now call Myrtle Beach, S.C. David attended Coastal Carolina University and like most of his family, has never left the area. David is the lead journalist at MyrtleBeachSC.com

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